About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
CNNW 30
MSNBCW 26
CSPAN 19
CSPAN2 18
KNTV (NBC) 4
SFGTV2 4
FBC 3
KGO (ABC) 3
KPIX (CBS) 3
KQED (PBS) 3
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 3
KTVU (FOX) 3
CNBC 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 147
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 147 (some duplicates have been removed)
anniversary of a number of civil rights flashpoints. 1963 was a pretty important year in the civil rights movement or would i will call the black freedom struggle for the rest of the talk and none will be more celebrated than the march on washington that happened on august 28, 1963. i think we can imagine that the focus will be -- this is probably what we are going to see a lot of. dr. king, the celebrity of dr. king and the i have a dream speech. maybe there will be some mentioning of the complex of the march on washington, the labor unions and the practice and made it possible and did all of the organizing. maybe we will hear about the full name of the march on washington which was the march on washington for jobs and freedom, and maybe we will even hear about the kennedy administration horror about this march. they didn't want this to happen. a were concerned there would lead to the point president kennedy's shut down the federal government other than for the essential personnel the day that this occurred in 63. but, i am pretty certain that the commemoration is mostly going to focus o
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and the demonstrated power of nonviolence and claims for participation in american citizenship and rights, why at this moment in the late 60's to the black panther party challenge america as an empire? way this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to the revolution and the black panther party? and so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we have developed in the book to give you a taste of some of it here. the first thing is that one of the things i was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is in the mid-60's there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l.a., san francisco, oakland, chicago, new york. a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains in the successes and the power of the civil rights movement and translate into that power that can challenge poverty. the civil rights movement have been tremendously successful at dismantling jim crow and d
the tremendous success of the civil rights movement and really the demonstrative power of nonviolent civil disobedience and claims of participation and citizenship, why in this moment did the black panther party challenge america as empire? why did this politics become so influential and important? why did so many young revolutionaries in cities throughout the country take up arms and dedicate their lives to revolution and the black panther party? so i'm going to touch on a few themes that we develop in the book just to give you sort of a taste of some of the pieces of the answer here. the first thing is that one of the things that was very surprising to me when we started to look at this is that in the mid '60s there were debates, rigorous debates happening in cities throughout the country, l. a.m., san francisco and oakland, chicago, new york, a real ferment, a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains and the successes and the power of the civil rights movement, and how do we translate that into the kind of power that can challenge poverty and ghettoization. the civi
afternoon. my name is rachel roberts and i am the civil rights coordinator for the council on american islamic relations san francisco bay area office. i would first of all like to thank you on behalf of our organization for supporting this important resolution and i would especially like to acknowledge the commitment and hard work of supervisor chiu and his wonderful staff. thank you. those of us who come from marginalized communities know that in tightxv of great fear and prejudice that it is not politically easy to stand with communities that are being scapegoated. today you have made it clear to the world that san francisco will not give in too bigtry. over the past 24 hours, we have heard from many members of the american muslim community. we are here to share their gratitude for your bravery and your commitment to diversity and inclusion. thank you. >> thank you. next speaker. >>> the greatest miscarriage of justice was when jesus was killed. and when they came to the place which is called calvary, there they crucified him and the malefactors, one on the right hand and one on the
. president obama wants the assistant attorney general for the justice department's civil rights division, thomas perez to be the next secretary of labor. mr. perez is seen by some to be a racial activist. here now to explain attorney and fox news anchor megyn kelly. you are actually covering this on your show. >> yeah. >> bill: that's high brow. >> we do some news on the news show. >> bill: nobody cares about the secretary of labor. most people don't care and i don't blame them. i don't care either. however, however, this appointment that president obama wants to make, this could be very telling about president obama. >> yeah. >> bill: tell me about perez. >> president obama's critics have been saying this sun necessarily divisive this choice. it would be hard to get somebody farther to the left than mr. perez and already some senators are threatening to try to block his confirmation because they believe he has been as one critic put it as quote a radical's radical. the deal with -- look, perez he went to harvard law school. he has experience in labor at the department of labor from mary
fighting funding for civil rights in the united states. this should last about an hour and a half. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [applause] >> good evening. i am delighted, truly delighted to see all of you here this evening because this is an extraordinary evening and an extraordinary program. a little preamble, i'm at the virginia foundation for the humanities and and i'm the present of their position which produces activities and programs. [applause] thank you. i'm here to tell you that this is the coldest book festival in history. [laughter] that's a short history, 19 years nonetheless it's the coldest and it doesn't appear to be getting better tomorrow or the next day either. very unusual but spring is again at 7:02 on wednesday. i'm sure none of you noticed along the way. we began that morning with the nineteentnineteent h annual virginia festival of books. next year we want you wanted to come back to the 20th which will begin on march the 19th and run it until the 23rd so we are moving back a day. we expect it to be warmer non
. >> this is a big historic moment. >> this is a basic civil rights issue. >> our colleague, our teachers, our soldiers, our friends. >> can you imagine the next presidential campaign, a republican candidate saying flat-out, i am for gay marriage? >> i could. >> immigration makes us stronger. it is part of what makes this such a dynamic country. >> no immigration reform is going to happen unless republicans in the house sign on to it. >> the time's come for comprehensive, sensible immigration reform. >> we are going to have a vote on assault weapons and we're going to have a vote on background checks. >> he can't spend enough of his $27 billion to try to impose his will on the american public. >> 90% of the public want something. >> i mean, it's insane the stuff he says. >> this isn't about wayne lapierre. it's about the public wanting to be safe on their streets. ♪ you don't need a weatherman to know it's where the wind blows ♪ >> it's a busy and wintery monday on the east coast. congress is on spring break as lawmakers return to their districts where they're likely to face constituents r
on civil rights for gay americans in bour versus hard wig. in the summer of 1982, michael baurs was arrested and charged by atlanta police by committing a private act with another adult man in his own bedroom. his case made it to the high court in 1986 where georgia's law criminalizing adult gay male couples for engaging in private consensual sexual acts was upheld. it was not until 203 that that decision was overruled when the court recognized the constitutional right to privacy for lesbian and gay individuals. the struggle still continues. ten years after bowers, hawaii supreme court found the state ban own same-sex marriage violated its constitution. almost immediately shall the state specific ruling sparked campaigns across the country to deny marriage rights to same sex couples. launching a preemptive strike against marriage equality more than 30 states passed defense of marriage laws putting pressure on the federal government to follow suit and in 1996, president bill clinton, the democrat, he signed the federal defense of marriage act restricting the definition of marriag
of labor. he comes directly from the department of justice where he's the head of the civil rights division, the division responsible for enforcing federal discrimination statutes. white house officials point to the fact that he helped settle the three largest fair lending cases in the department history as some of the reasons why he should be the head over at labor. however, republicans are pointing to a report issued by the department of justice's i.g. last week, the inspector general that basically said that division that perez leads is still in two camps. they're examples of harassment, inappropriate personnel attacks and the i.g.'s report basically found all those issues predate president obama's tenure in office. however, they really haven't been addressed to the satisfaction of the i.g., inspector general, thus far. mr. perez says he's worked with the department, that there have been improvements since he's taken office there but a number of republicans are pointing to this, especially senator grassley saying that mr. perez is woefully unprepared to answer questions about this. remem
is the object of civil rights movement. but they never have jojo as a child. but the reader identifies with horton. he's our man can ease our guy. he is our floppy nice element -- nice elephant who is saving someone like me. but he lives in the jungle with a kangaroo give this is not the readers everyday world. --t is the world of google of hooville. that is the world of dr. seuss's child reader. it's as if horton is a mega planet saving the tiny planet earth. or maybe given the socio- specificity of hooville, the modern west. so when the mayor urges for a last voice to make the hoos h crib somestarts on a path where a tiny figure dressed in crimson stands alone. his noses in the air. there is a smirk on his face. he knows what is going on and he doesn't care. he is the kind of child who in 50 stock is cruising for a bruising. who, in 1950s talk, is cruising for a bruising. the mayor grabs the young twerp. leading him up the tower and there is a wonderful bouncing scene where jojo is on the outstretched hand of the mayor and is ready to make a big statement. he clears his throat and he
to doma. this was john lewis, 1996, talking about the civil right, the right of a human being to marry another. their there has been a long struggle for civil right for gay and lesbian people. and there were people early on who recognized this was a fundamental civil rights issue. the reason people are coming to that view is because of people coming out in their countries and whether it is john roberts or other people in the country realizing that they are brothers and sisters and cousins of people who are gay and lesbian. and it is inevitable. watching ralph reed with the most ridiculous argument i've ever heard of the many ridiculous arguments against gay marriage. he's arguing the only reason people get player sid to have children. people get married because they want to be in a loving, committed relationship with each other. there is no reason that fundamental right should be denied. >> to steve's point, ralph reed was not discussing the lawful he is talking about religion and emotional reaction to marriage and the sanctity of it. i want to play this. he was on "meet the press." >>
series on civil rights continues with filmmaker, keith beauchamp. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ >> michael: a federal judge began hearing testimony today to determine if policemen have been stopping people unconstitutionally. defenders of the program state has brought down gun violence but they say at its core it is racial profiling that violates the constitution. joining me now is keith beauchamp, keith direct theed the documentary "the untold story of emmett louis till" and hosts the "the injustice files: hood of suspicion" which examines contemporary cases of racial profiling. keith welcome to "the war room." >> thank you for having me. >> michael: keith, new york saw 419 murders last year. the lowest numbers since record keeping began in the 1960s, so is this a small price to pay for a safer community? >> i think it causes a bigger problem. you are talk about statistically if you look at these cases out of 1 in 1,000 cases of those stops, you have actual gun violations. when you take a look at the percentage of those being stopped, out of 90% there are no arrest o
. >>> 48 years ago this month, the nation reached a turning point in the civil rights movement. the third and decisive civil rights march from selma to birmingham, alabama. >> kill, burn, bomb destroy. people go into selma is a whole different game. >> reporter: harry bellefonte remembers the backdrop, the selma to montgomery marches in 1965. 50 miles had to be covered, but the real obstacle was hate. not long after 600 marchers began on sunday, march 7th, police brutally beat them, driving them back to selma. >> when bloody sunday happened and then dr. king decided to march again after it. what was the mood? >> the mood was anger. the mood was rebellious. the question is, what do we do in the face of this kind of rage and mayhem. the bottom line is we will go back as often as necessary. >> reporter: bring artists into the movement convince the likes of joe biaz and marlin brando but one of his first calls was to old friend and supporter tony bennett. >> i didn't want to do it, but then he told me what went down, what was going down and how some blacks were burned with gasoline thrown on
insurance. >>> this week marks the 48th anniversary of the third and decisive civil rights march from selma to montgomery, alabama. harry belafonte recruited tony bennett to march with him it happened has marchers tried to cross the bridge, known as bloody sunday. the message of civil rights still permeates today. >> selma was different, that they were willing to kill, bomb, burn, destroy, so to ask our people to go there was a whole different game. >> he remembers the selma to montgomery marches in 1965. 50 miles had to be covered, but the real obstacle was hate. not along at 600 marchers began on sunday, march 7th, police brutally beat them, driving them back to selma. >> when bloody selma happened and then dr. king decided to march again after it, what was the mood? >> the mood was the mood was rebellious. the question is, what do we do in the face of this kind of rage and this kind of mayhem. the bottom line was that we go back as often as necessary. >> belafonte, enlisted by dr. king to bring artists into the movement, convinced the likes of joan baez, paul newman and marlon brando, bu
to marry, even from imprisoned felons. this is a basic civil rights issue. i don't think this is the kind of issue that will divide the court the way other issues divide the court. >> asia mills and jimmy la sylvia, director of go proud. good to see you both. >> thanks for having me. >> frank bruni said the final chapter of this story has in fact been written. the question isn't whether there will be a happy ending, the question is when. asia, is he right? >> absolutely. the tide has completely shifted on the as you announced earlier, the polling on marriage equality. we know this is not a matter of if, it is a matter of when. the states are moving this direction, it is a matter of time. >> even with the politicians, you see this move. jimmy, i was thinking about the fact that gay rights supporters weren't welcome at cpac, and you know who was, phyllis shaf lee, credited with turning back the equal rights amendment when in the '70s it seemed like a done deal. is it possible the celebrations are premature? >> i can tell you i agree, we have reached a tipping point on this. i was part of a
here at the law school. prior to joining aclu, he was the chief of the civil rights bureau and the office of the new york state attorney general. he spent 14 yes at the naacp legal defense fund where he supervised the litigation throughout theountry that address matters of elementary and secondary education, a formative action in higher education, and equal educational opportunit he is also the reason why sarah was able to say such nice tings about me because he was my supervisor when i was there and taught me everything that i know. he will discuss issues of racial equality, growing rights and speeches in "the year of the turtle." our seco speaker is peter nicholas. he is a officer of lot the. -- at the university of washington school of law. prior to pursuing in the law, professor nicholas was a research economist at the university of michigan and served as a member of the ann arbor cy council. he will discuss the speeches and the current battles over gay rights, same-sex marriage, the gay minority and the gay minority in the leaders of the african american community. we
will nominate thomas harris as the new labor secretary. he heads the justice department civil rights division. he faced criticism for giving misleading testimony to the u.s. mission on civil rights. he would replace hilda sill lease. instead of eating while you were distracted you are consuming more calories. people who eat meals or snacks watching tv playing games or reading tend to eat more. >> i do believe that study. >> the u.s. postal service is $16 billion in debt and stopping saturday delivery to stay athroat they say. you wouldn't know it by the way the agency is spending millions to send workers to a lavish conference in california and it is happening this week. we have an inside look at the event. >> here at the annual postal forum executives will meet with thousands of shippers and those in the direct mail industry. and then everyone gets to have a good time in stan fran. there's a guolf outing dance an food from the fisherman's wharf and chinatowchinatown. the travel exhibit space and other incidentals will cost the postal service $2.2 million lass. the agency receives no tax doll
of all colors. in 1968, dr. king told now is the time to come from the civil rights movement to the human rights movement. meaningful equality he said could not be achieved through civil rights alone. without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise. so in honor of dr. king, and all those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to and mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a movement for jobs, not jail. a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights, to work, to shelter, and the food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? first i believe we've got to begin by telling the truth. the whole truth. we've got to be willing to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to re-create a caste like system in this country. we've got to be willing to tell the truth in our schools, in our churches and o
. there is nothing civil about letting somebody without their right mind decompensate to the to point that they lose their lives and sometimes other people lose their lives. our mother recently had called me and said that her son had been on the streets because he also left their house and the police called her first thing in the morning. she hadn't seen him in a long time and he had paranoid schizophrenia. they said your son is in the hospital. we arrested him on a 51/50. he was walking naked in the street in the middle of the night talking to himself. the mother and father jumped in the car and went to the emergency room and by the time they got there, the hospital had released him. i don't understand this. it's just, you know, i'm not a lawyer and i wasn't in the mental health field before, i just, i don't understand it. the qualifications and criteria for a holder extreme and they are unrealistic. a person much be imminently danger to self or others or gravely disabled before they are picked up. if your shelter is under a freeway, if he knows of a garbage can that he can frequent, he's not grave
a two-state solution, the president asserted that forging a lasting peace is a matter of civil rights. couching it the broader question of what it means to be a democracy. a return to the signature themes of the 2008 campaign and the early days of his presidency. as he outlined in cairo in 2009, the president began by affirming america's respect and its commitment. >> i've come here to cairo to seek a new beginning. between the united states and muslims around the world. one based on mutual interest and mutual respect. so long as there is a united states of america. [ speaking foreign language ] >> you are not alone. >> as he did in his landmark 2008 speech on race, the president argued that despite our differences, it is hope and the fundamental optimism about the next generation, that bonds us together. >> we may not look the same and may not have come from the same place, but we all want to move in the same direction. towards a better future for our children. and our grandchildren. >> but before i, before i came here, i met with a group of young palestinians. i honestly believe tha
.org/possibilities. >>> tomorrow, the supreme court will begin hearing arguments in two of the biggest civil rights cases to reach its docket in years, if not in decades. up for consideration, doma, the so-called defense of marriage act, and california's proposition 8. as the court prepares for an historic moment, more public figures are weighing in. we can now add senator claire mccaskill of missouri and senator mark warner of virginia to the growing number of current and former lawmakers throwing their support behind marriage equality. senator mccaskill wrote, "i have come to the conclusion that our government should not limit the right to marry based on who you love. while churches should never be required to conduct marriages outside of their religious beliefs, neither should the government tell people who they have a right to marry." senator mark warner announced his support for marriage equality in a facebook post. "i support marriage equality because it is the fair and right thing to do." one of the two lawyers arguing against california's prop 8, david boyce, has predicted vark victory. >> i think we're g
, an historic civil rights march. the reverend martin luther king jr. led 25,000 marchers to the st state capitol to protest the denial of voting rights to blacks. >>> happy birthday to aretha franklin. she turns 71. >>> here's a look at what's coming up on the "today" show. former penn state assistant coach jerry sandusky speaks out from behind bars for the first time since being convicted of child abuse. and usher talks about joining "the voice" ahead of tonight's season premiere. a shout-out to knbc and our friends at "today in l.a." last friday i was out there visiting, and they couldn't have been any more welcoming. great morning show and great morning team. thanks for the 70-degree weather. we need that. right, bill? keep it on this channel. i'm richard lui along with bill karins. thanks for watching "early today," just your first stop of the day on your nbc station. have a great monday. . . . >>> new this morning, the search for a swimmer who disappeared off the coast of half moon bay continues. we'll have the latest details next. >>> plus, people all over in the bay area getting r
nixon and eisenhower it was a civil rights party of lincoln and the the democrats -- >> jackie robinson. >> and martin luther king was a big supporter until they had a bad moment when nixon didn't come to his aid. nixon was working in the senate and lobbied for a stronger version of the 1967 bill that was a landmark bill at the time, so they were very different parties and the leaders of the party there was a liberal and conservative wing so to speak, the conservative wing, people like robert taft, he was an isolationist but he supported the pensions. he had a real social conscience and so on. there were out fliers to the trustees six out fliers in the country and there was senator mccarthy but they were out fliers to be dated and speak with authority, and in fact even though eisenhower was reluctant to take anybody on directly, she felt he did want to get mccarthy from the party that put next-gen up to it. >> one of the challenges for someone writing about richard nixon i think, i would like to know if you share this view, that we have an ocean of information about him as president lar
of churches and civil rights movement and when you look at the role really of societal movements, they often leap ahead of the law. and we're seeing that right now with this is an example. the fact this can happen in winston salem, again, it's the fifth largest city here in north carolina. you know, this is really unprecedented and you know, among methodist churches, you have some others in places like austin and chicago and of course, california, that that have enacted similar moves like this, but not in the deep south. not in north carolina. this is really important what's happening here. >> give me a brief answer. do you think we'll see marriage equality in your lifetime? >> in north carolina? well, you know, i write about manners, so not a great thing to ask someone their edge, but i'm hopeful that it's coming. >> all right. thank you so very much. >> thank you, michael. >> that's the ed show. the rachel maddow show starts now. >>> thanks to you at home for joining us. the great state of florida does not right now have a lieutenant governor. they have a governor, of course. you know, old
in our party. >> but if certain voices seem intent to move forward on civil rights, the party's right flank is digging in its heels. >> young conservatives, 30 and under, 35 and under, gay marriage, all that matters. homosexual marriage. if the party makes that something official, that they support, they're not going to pull the homosexual activist voters away from the democrat party. but they are going to -- cause their base to stay home. and throw their hands up in utter frustration. >> similar frustration was echoed by evangelicals and social conservatives. family reform council president tony perkins has wrote this week, raince priebus's has decided that the way for his party -- >> president of the national organization for marriage, brian brown, sass the grassroots of the party are 100% committed to protecting marriage and you can't just kick them to the curb. >> and according to faith and freedom coalition founder, raffle reed, if the republican party tries to retreat from being a pro marriage, pro family party, the big tent is going to become a pup tent very fast. >> will repub
. in 1968, dr. king told advocates the time had come to transition from the civil rights movement to the human rights movement. many photo-quality could not be achieved through civil rights allowed without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to quality education. civil rights are empty promise. in honor of dr. king and all those who labor to win the election crow, i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to end mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a group that for jobs, not jails. is limited and we limited analytical discrimination against people. discrimination that denies basic human rights to work, shelter and two food. what a sweet deal? first we've got to begin by telling the church, the wiltshire. we've got to be willing to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to re-create a catholic system in this country. we got to be willing to tell the center places of worship, behind artist and inventor center. we got to be willing to tell the truth so great awakening to the reality of what has occurred can c
-- >> yes. and civil rights. he said to all of them, i agree with all of your positions. i want all of your things. but i have to tell you something, i'm not going to be able to do it. and i'm not going to do it. you're going to have to make me do it. he said that to them, make me do it. so fellow americans, that's our job. if we are calling ourselves citizens, that means we are participants in democracy. it is not that they sit back and they sit in some hall some place. we are the ones in charge. they are our servant. they are there to serve us. if they don't hear from us, then you know, who is going to win out are the money people. the gun manufacturers, national rifle association, people that grease the palms. that's who will win out. but this is what the nra is scared about tonight and gun manufacturers. there's a lot more of us than there are of them. >> no doubt. so they won't be able to hold us hostage. let's talk about something else you're doing, because i want to get this in. first i thought you were making house party part 4 but i discovered that's not what is going on. you are g
america's civil rights leader, who was assassinated trying to fight for civil rights in honor of the israeli leader, yitzhak rabin, who was assassinated trying to fight for peace. it's both a symbolic way of the president saying, i deeply understand the israeli struggle, and i also deeply believe that it's worth sacrifice and hard work to continue to fight for peace. quite a way to end his trip. >> quite a way, indeed. jessica yellin, live this morning, thanks for being with us. ahead on "starting point," the nra turning its sights on a new new york gun control law. is this measure unconstitutional? we're going to get reaction from aurora shooting survivor stephen barton. >>> and a 15-year-old girl is trapped when burglars enter her home. >> hey, bring the bucket over here. >> okay, don't talk. >> bring it over here. >> how she survived in her own words. next. you're watching "starting point." [ male announcer ] rita's suitcase got lost a few months back. hi. i got a call today that you guys found my suitcase. we don't have it. you don't even know my name. [ sniffs ] are you w
's civil rights division as his mom knee to head the labor d., and we will carry that announcement live at about 11:40 eastern this morning here on c-span2. also at 12:30, remarks from michigan senator carl levin. he'll be speaking at the council on foreign relations on u.s. defense policy issues. life coverage begins at 12:30 eastern again here on c-span2. and the u.s. house and senate return today to consider continuing funding for the federal government past march 27th when current funding expires. they're also expected to work on their respective budget plans for fiscal year 204. the house back at 2 p.m. for legislative business. floor debate likely while members wait for the senate to ask. also the senate in at 3 p.m. --2 p.m. eastern. and then hoping to move on to the 2014 budget resolution, and they hope to get it approved before by the end of the week before the easter recess. life coverage of the house, as usual, on c-span and, of course, the senate right here on c-span2. ..2 last week endorsed a review of military roles to allow seniors to manage overturns sexual assault victi
's the right thing to do. it's a civil rights issue. it's not just gay people who want you to be for marriage equali equality. it's a broad segment of the electorate. if you look at that poll the majority of catholics are for marriage equality. a majority of -- the minority communities are for marriage equality. i just think it is more and more a basic civil rights issue that people are going to expect you to be on the right side of. >> steve, thanks so much. good to see you. >> good to see you. >>> in south carolina today the first test of former governor mark sanford's attempt at a post scandal political comeback. sanford running against 15 other republican candidates for congress. in 2009 you'll remember he stepped down as governor after admitting an extra marital affair with an argentinian woman. among his opponents ted turner's son teddy. the primary is expected to go to a round. i had enough of feeling embarrassed about my skin. [ designer ] enough of just covering up my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically p
or the pro-gun control or the anti-gun control movement -- >> the civil rights movement -- >> the civil rights movement. >> the suffragette movement, women's rights, you've got to be organized. >> absolutely. you've got to be organized. and what we see, remember that 16% i identified as the alarmed? again people who are very concerned and think this is an urgent problem, but they feel relatively isolated and alone. they say, "i feel this way, some of my friends and family feel this strongly." but they have no sense that they're part of over 40 million americans that feel just as strongly as they do. they've never been properly organized, mobilized and directed to demand change. and, i mean, that's what the political system ultimately responds to. if you basically have a vacuum of people who are demanding change, and i don't mean that truly. i mean, there are of course many great organizations that have been advocating for change for a long time. but it hasn't been a broad based citizens movement demanding change. in that situation a relatively small but well-funded and vocal community t
's made protecting that promise for everybody the cause of his life. as a civil rights attorney, an aide to senator ted kennedy, a member of the montgomery, maryland, county council. tom fought for a level playing field where hard work and responsibility are rewarded and working families can get ahead. and this is not the first time he's chosen to be a labor secretary either. we've got here today governor martin o'malley. and martin appointed tom as secretary of maryland's department of labor where he helped implement the country's first statewide living wage law because he understood minimum wage should be a wage you can live on. and current role as the head of the u.s. justice department and civil rights position he's fought to open pathways into the work force for everyone willing to contribute including people with disabilities, lgbt americans and immigrants. and he's helped settle some of the largest cases ever on behalf of families targeted by unfair mortgage lending. now, while he's tackled plenty of tough issues, tom's also spent a career as a consensus voter. he's worked with ce
to embrace civil rights. it's important to young voters. republican, independent and democrat. no, not one person was willing to take on the issue of gay marriage, which is, of course, the central issue they were implying is driving some young, a lot of younger voters in this country. so they have massive problems. the other problem is that when you look at this report, what they're trying to do, and jonathan martin in "politico" wrote a nice piece about this today. they're suggesting structural changes that will make it much harder for insurgent candidates like the rand pauls or the rick santorums to challenge for the nomination by shortening the process by condensing, by aggregating primaries so that you have to cover a lot more territory. by eliminating caucuses and conventions as a means of nominating candidates by a state. all of those things would give establishment candidates a much better chance to win the nomination and may give the republican party a better chance to win a national election. but they're courting a rebellion among their own troops and you saw some of that at cpac
to overturn prop 8 is that this is like civil rights. that this is the civil rights movement moved to the gay and lesbian community. why is that not the case? >> well, we understand historically that keeping the races apart is wrong. what marriage is about is bringing together the two opposite halves of humanity for a deep social good. that's why as president obama himself said, there are people of good will on both sides of this issue. what we need the supreme court to do is not try to short circuit this debate. we need to keep the debate alive. americans on both sides of this issue are deeply invested in this debate. we don't need a 50-state solution presented by the supreme court. the court is going to decide whether it's going to impose a redefinition of marriage among all americans or whether we're going to be allowed to continue to work on this together state by state. >> so not a roe v. wade decision is what's being argumented, don't make a decision that then sets the stage arguing four years to come. >> look, candy, this case -- the case before the united states supreme court both in
in which you don't have to have a majority position. civil rights not put up for a vote. right. that's right. >> frequently. >> frequently although now what has happened is that this sea change meant they can be successfully put up for a vote. how -- but the third part of it is this interpersonal thing. dan, you said this thing the last time you were on the show, you said the superpower lgbt people have, inherently mixed among the population. >> we are born into the families of the, you know, oppressor class. for lack of any better term. gay people are born to straight parents. the most dash single most for political act of any lgbt person can take is to be out to family and friends. we saw in ohio with senator portman the difference that can make. it can open someone's eyes. republican failure of empathy. senator portman wasn't for marriage when other people's children were allowed to marry, other people's children were gay. now that he has gay child, he sees the justice in gay marriage. we will take the support however we can get it. it shouldn't take people's kids come out but oft
in the civil rights division and found perez gave misleading public testimony when he said in 2010 that political appointees cannot make the decisions to drop prosecution of the new black panther party members. you can read that whole story in politico this morning. to want get to your calls though on this subject of the changes in the republican party, this plan for more outreach, scheduled changes with the conventions and primary. al sect next from colorado. good morning, alec. caller: yes, good morning. i think that rand paul did really well at cpac, and marco rubio is pretty good as well. i just want to say that people like mccain, they served honorably in the military and stuff like that. however, it is time for a change, a new kind of republican party that can reach out to a lot more people. the demographics of america changed, i guess it's a little bit more moderate now. it used to be a center-right nation, and now it's probably center-left, so we probably do need to move the needle toward the center a little bit. as for rand paul, i really do like the fact that he had that
will happen 8:40 our time and the 51- year-old perez has been in charge of the civil rights division since 2009 and he will be the first latino to be nominated by president barack obama for the cabinet and the former person returned home last month. >>> they rejected a federal mediator's proposal for a cooling off period. they have been canceled since musicians went on strike and there is no word on when negotiations can continue. they are coming for the world baseball classic . yesterday puerto rico beat them and they move onto the finals. angel pagan is playing for the giants and another winner for tonight's game, they will play for tomorrow night. remember the parking meter prizes went up earlier this month and it can run as much as the 7 bucks an hour. >>> something new on bart this morning. brian flores is now in oakland with how riders are reacting to bikes on board and what you need to know if you will be taking bart today, brian? >> reporter: so far we have spoken to commuters and this is the second time bikes on bart has been tested and if you do take the trains this morning expec
to be his labor secretary. perez heads the justice department's civil rights division. he has been criticized, though, by some conservatives who think he's too partisan, but he is considered a civil rights hero by others. if confirmed, perez would be the only latino in obama's cabinet. >>> and take a look here at this actor who is playing the role of satan in the history channel miniseries, "the bible." all right. so if you think it looks anything like president obama, you are not alone. social media blew up after the scene aired. there were nearly 20,000 tweets containing the words obama and satan. the producer of the show is denying that it was intentional, saying, quote, this is utter nonsense. the actor who played satan is a highly acclaimed moroccan actor, and he has previously played parts of several biblical epics, long before barack obama was elected as our president. the history channel weighed in, too, releasing this statement. quote, history channel has the highest respect for president obama. it's unfortunate that anyone made this false connection. the silver lining in
lawyer said ranta planned to file a civil rights lawsuit against the city of new york and the police department. because the incarceration had an immense effect on his health. >> fifteen train cars went off the tracks when a freight train derailed saturday in southern virginia. four of them ended up in the russell fork river. according to the transportation company, c-s- x, one of the derailed cars was leaking. it contained propionic acid, a corrosive material. a hazardous materials team is on the scene. the train was headed from north carolina to kentucky when the accident happened. no injuries were reported. >> big dreamers in 42 states are rushing to buy powerball tickets. the jackpot has climbed to it's sixth highest point. a whopping 3-hundred-20- million dollars. if there's a winner who takes the cash payout. it adds up to just under 2- hundred-million. that's quite a return on a 2-dollar ticket. the drawing is tonight at 8:59 p-m. if you want a ticket == you can head to arizona or oregon. or next month, california is state. >> if anybody can get to arizona in 14 minutes it is
and the 51- year-old perez has been in charge of the civil rights division since 2009 and he will be the first latino to be nominated by president barack obama for the cabinet and the former person returned home last month. >>> they rejected a federal mediator's proposal for a cooling off period. they have been canceled since musicians went on strike and there is no word on when negotiations can continue. they are coming for the world baseball classic . yesterday puerto rico beat them and they move onto the finals. angel pagan is playing for the giants and another winner for tonight's game, they will play for tomorrow night. remember the parking meter prizes went up earlier this month and it can run as much as the 7 bucks an hour. >>> something new on bart this morning. brian flores is now in oakland with how riders are reacting to bikes on board and what you need to know if you will be taking bart today, brian? >> reporter: so far we have spoken to commuters and this is the second time bikes on bart has been tested and if you do take the t
. perez currently heads the civil rights division of the justice department. did confirmed he would be the only hispanic member of the cabinet. still, perez could face an uphill battle at his confirmation hearing. republican senators may take issue with his handling of cases the last several years, including his challenges to voter i.d. laws in south carolina and texas. >>> we move on to business. today cypress' parliament will hold an emergency vote to approve bailout terms. it appears the country's law patients would not approve that measure which would result in a loss of much-needed funds. what it means for the rest of europe? we chenlg in with steve sedgwick live in london for us. good morning. >> very good day to you. just when you think europe's getting its act together another crisis comes along. we've had greece, spain, italy, ireland, portugal, now cyprus, the sec-smallest nation wind the european union. what is different about this potential bailout is the original cost is around 18 billion euros for the imf and cb but they want to get the costs down by taxing depositors.
is the department of justice leading up to civil rights division. president obama in his nomination says that he believes that thomas perez will push his administration's priorities at the labor department. >> we're going to have to work very hard to make sure that folks find jobs with good wages and good benefits. we have to make sure veterans returning home from iraq and afghanistan have a chance to put their incredible skills and leadership to work at home. we need to build ag immigration system that works for every employee and every family and every business. >> some republicans criticizing the pick according to a department of justice inspector general report showing deep ideological divisions within the department that thomas perez headed up predating the obama administration. republicans charge the decisions whether to pursue certain cases or not were politically motivated, that from senator jeff sessions, a republican from alabama, nominating mr. perez to the important post, the president placed his drive to promote his flawed immigration policies over the needs of millions unemployed a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 147 (some duplicates have been removed)